Tag Archives: Usage Scenario

RECO Tracking Use Cases #1. Optimal Resource Distribution Through Vehicle Tracking

Fork-lift trucks are one of the necessities in factories or warehouses that stacks a large amount of products. As much as it is widely used, the efficient usage of such vehicles can drive up the productivity by a significant margin.

Thus, we will talk about how to optimize resource distribution by RECO Tracking, a BLE-based object and people tracking solution. For anyone who is not familiar with RECO Tracking, the post below will serve as a good introduction.

*Related Post: What is RECO Tracking?

 3 Steps of vehicle tracking

3 steps of vehicle tracking
3 Steps of Vehicle Tracking For Improving Productivities

 Step 1. Assign each vehicle with a beacon with unique ID.

 Step 2. Set ‘Tracking Zone’ by installing RECO Manager Pluses at your points of interest. The installed RECO Manager Pluses will consistently look for any nearby beacons, recognizing any ‘Entering’ activities of the vehicles.

 Step 3. With multiple ‘Tracking Zones’ set up, it is not only possible to track the vehicles’ current location, but also possible to record and analyze the movement history of each vehicle.

Also, you can assign certain zones as ‘dangerous’, and get notified upon entrance of any vehicle to those dangerous zones to prevent any potential accident.

Faster and More!

Through this solution, the supervisor gains information about movements of all vehicles. This improvement enables the supervisor to intelligently assign works based on current situation. A company called ‘Bobcat’ introduced fork-lift truck tracking solution using barcodes, and increased the freight carrying efficiency by 30% as a result.

Moreover, as the data on vehicles locations, tracks, and productivity accumulates, operations and productions can be optimized through careful analysis on the cumulative data and making changes accordingly.

As a result, RECO Tracking lets you make the best out of the limited resources.


On this post, we discussed about a way to facilitate operation and increase productivity. We will follow up with the convenience of inventory and asset management when using RECO Tracking on the next post.

For any interest in RECO Tracking, please contact us through the link below, and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

visit our homepage to contact us

Why is RECO Manager needed for beacon managment and whom is it for?

RECO Manager, currently in pre-order, is an innovative beacon management product that connects to and manages all the beacons within its range. As long as you install each RECO Beacon within range of a RECO Manager, you will be able to log on from anywhere and use the web-based RECO Cloud Console to remotely manage your entire beacon system, no matter how large or how far flung.

If you are currently running a beacon service, the benefits of using RECO Manager will come to you immediately just by reading the general description above. However, if you are currently exploring the possibility of implementing a beacon system, you might wonder why RECO Manager is needed and whom it will benefit most.

 

Why is RECO Manager needed?

Currently, without RECO Manager, continuous onsite maintenance is required to provide a reliable beacon service. There is no way to know whether a beacon is low on battery, physically damaged, or even stolen without being present at the installation point. Also, if you want to change the configuration settings of each beacon, the maintenance crew has to change each beacon manually within the beacon’s signal range. These beacon management issues cause high maintenance costs and are the major reasons why many businesses are hesitant on implementing a beacon system.

RECO Manager is a product that solves such management issues. When installed together with RECO Beacon, it allows managers to remotely monitor all the beacons within the RECO Manager’s range and change configurations when needed. With RECO Manager’s powerful beacon management functions, the cost of maintaining a beacon system is drastically reduced making RECO Manager a game changer.

 

Whom is RECO Manager for?

RECO Manager’s core benefits are best utilized in remote/large scale beacon services. Below are some examples of when you should consider installing a RECO Manager.

1. You need to remotely manage beacons

If you don’t have an onsite maintenance crew to monitor the beacon service status daily, the web-based RECO Cloud Console will benefit you greatly. You can access the Cloud Console from anywhere with any device with access to the internet and monitor the beacons. What’s even better is, since RECO Manager will notify you by e-mail in case a maintenance issue occurs, you actually don’t even need to log-in daily.

2. You have multiple venues in different locations and want to manage all the beacons synchronously

If you are a business manager for a national or even worldwide retail store chain, maintaining a high service level at each store is going to be difficult. Every in-store manager has to be trained to monitor the beacons installed and respond according to the different maintenance issue. By installing RECO Managers at every store, maintaining the beacon service becomes a one man job, and in-store managers are only needed when beacons need to be replaced with new ones. Replacing beacons are simple as well. The in-store manager doesn’t need to configure or register each beacon since RECO Manager detects and registers new beacons automatically, while configuration can be done with a few clicks from the Cloud Console.

3. You have a big venue with a large fleet of beacons

Installing and managing a beacon system for large venues such as a museum or a sports stadium is a lot of work. Hundreds of beacons can be installed in a single large venue, making service monitoring a nightmare for the maintenance crew. By installing RECO Managers at the central points, monitoring hundreds of beacons can be done in a heartbeat.

4. You want to integrate the beacon management functions into an existing management system

RECO Manager comes with the RECO Cloud API for easy system integration. If you already have a management system such as CRM, CMS, or a PMS and want to integrate the beacon management functions provided by the RECO Cloud Console, RECO Manager is your solution.

 

To learn more about RECO Manager and pre-order your own, visit RECO website RECO2.me.

Lord of the Beacons: RECO Manager

Three hundred beacons for Miami the Magic City,

Seven hundred for New York the City that Never Sleeps,

Nine hundred for Los Angeles the City of Angels,

One device for the Manager on his comfortable chair

In the office of headquarter where the manager lie.

One device to rule them all, One device to find them,

One device to bring them all and in the cloud bind them

In the office of headquarter where the manager lie.”

 

-RECO Team Blog’s epigraph to “The Lord of the Beacons: RECO Manager”

RECO ManagerRECO Manager is an innovative beacon management product that connects and manages all the beacons in proximity. By installing RECO Manager with RECO Beacons, you can efficiently and remotely manage all your beacons around the world by accessing the web based RECO Cloud Console. You can also integrate the beacon management functions to your existing system with the RECO Cloud API. Pre-order RECO Manager to provide the best beacon experience to your customers.

RECO Manager pre-order started on January 29, 2015

Check out the RECO website RECO2.me for more information

What is Possible with Beacons and Bluetooth LE: Dreams Beaconning Reality

With a general understanding of Bluetooth Low Energy and beacons, (if you’re still in the dark, see our previous posts on Bluetooth LE and beacons) now you must be wondering how you can utilize this technology to develop new business opportunities or create unique customer experiences for your services. In order to do so, you must consider the different scenarios of integrating beacons and determine which scenario best suits your need. In this post, we will break down beacon user scenarios into three categories and give examples for you to use as a guideline in determining your own way of exploiting beacons.

Any service or solution using beacons will always have to consider two factors in structuring the user scenario: beacons and receivers. With this in mind, the three basic scenarios for beacons are:

  1. Beacons as a constant and receivers as a variable
  2. Beacons as a variable and receivers as a constant
  3. Beacons and receivers both as variables

To further explain the terminology used here to describe the different situations, beacons are device that send out a Bluetooth LE signal and receivers are devices that detect signals from beacons. Although any smart device like a smartphone or tablet can be used as a receiver, receivers do not necessarily have to be smart devices or even connected to a network, if you set them up planning for that.

To continue, a “constant” means a device that does not physically move to a different location during the entire duration of the service, and a “variable” means a device that is free to roam around as needed. For instance a beacon or a receiver attached to a wall is considered a “constant”, and any smartphone on the street can be considered a “variable”.

beacons are device that send out a Bluetooth LE signal and receivers are devices that detect signals from beacons

Scenario 1 is currently the most well known case of the three, since it is easily suited to a B2C context. The most common example would be a retail store push notification system, where retailers can push information to customers’ smartphones such as coupons, special offers, or product recommendations. Another example of scenario 1 is placing beacons in venues such as museums and galleries. By placing a beacon on each artifact, you can create an automated docent system where visitors receive additional information about each artifact as they approach it. The additional information can be in any form, from simple text and images to videos or even narration in different languages.

Scenario 2 is more challenging to develop as a service model and it is generally more suited to a B2B context. A simple application of scenario 2 would be a cargo tracking system. By attaching beacons to cargo container trucks and placing receivers at the docking sites, you can track the time and place each cargo is unloaded. A more complex version of this example would be attaching beacons to shopping carts in large grocery stores. By installing receivers on every aisle, you could track each shopper’s movement path and use this data to analyze customers’ shopping behaviors.

Scenario 3 is the most unique and creative scenario and has the most room to be explored. A great example of scenario 3 is the lost and found service model. By attaching a beacon to an object or even a person, such as a young child, you can track the whereabouts of the variable objects in proximity to your variable receiver, in this case your smartphones. When the variable beacon you registered is out of range of your smartphone you will be alerted via alarm, e-mail, or even a phone call. If another person is using the same lost and found service, and the lost beacon that is out of your receiver’s range comes into that person’s proximity, he or she can alert you the location so you can track back and find your beacon. This is a great service that can be very useful if it can scale up to provide enough geographic coverage.

Although we simplified the scenarios to consider just two factors, beacons and receivers, it is technically possible for receivers to act as beacons by changing the configuration, which can lead to more application possibilities. The user scenarios and service examples given in this post are just a glimpse of the potential that exists in the world of beacons and Bluetooth LE. However there are also limitations you must consider before jumping into developing services using beacons, and we will look more into those in our next post.